Myrrh’s Many Uses

by Lynn Kwitt on November 14, 2014

. . .Then, opening their treasures, they offered Him gifts, gold, frankincense and Myrrh. Matthew 2:11b

This month’s oil lover’s meeting highlighted Christmas Spirit, Frankincense and Myrrh. Since we have already spoken about Frankincense, we will talk about Myrrh now and Christmas Spirit next month.

Also known as The Oil of Gilead, Myrrh is reddish-

. . .Then, opening their treasures, they offered Him gifts, gold, frankincense and Myrrh. Matthew 2:11b

This month’s oil lover’s meeting highlighted Christmas Spirit, Frankincense and Myrrh. Since we have already spoken about Frankincense, we will talk about Myrrh now and Christmas Spirit next month.

Also known as The Oil of Gilead, Myrrh is reddish-brown and resinous from the dried sap of Commiphora Myrrha, a tree native to Somalia.

High quality Myrrh, which can be seen in Young Living’s “Essence of the Season” kit, is identified by the darkness, clarity and stickiness of the broken fragments. Anyone who has used Young Living’s Myrrh oil, at one time or another has probably had trouble opening the bottle attesting to its quality.

Unlike most other resins Myrrh expands and “blooms” when burned, instead of melting or liquefying.

The name Myrrh is derived from the Arabic “Murr,” meaning bitter, as the scent is pleasant, though sharp and somewhat bitter. In Chinese medicine Myrrh is warm and dry in energy.

Historically, Myrrh is mentioned 156 times in the Bible, although the name was frequently used as a general term to identify any gum or resin of the day produced from desert trees and shrubs. It was, and continues to be used as a fixative, increasing the longevity of the aroma of whatever fragrance it is combined with without dominating or overpowering that fragrance….from Healing Oils of the Bible by David Stewart.

Myrrh was used at both Jesus’ birth and his death, as it was commonly used as an embalming ointment. Nicodemus wound Jesus’ body in linen cloths and a mixture of aloes and Myrrh in keeping with Jewish custom. Burned as incense by the Ancient Hebrews to honor the dead, Myrrh was also added to wine to prepare for religious ceremonies by raising consciousness….from Aromatherapy for Healing the Spirit by Gabriel Mojay.

Myrrh was a widely used toiletry in ancient times as it still is today. In fact Hebrews chewed the resin as a gum to prevent infection to mouth, teeth and gums. Myrrh is best used topically on location. It can be taken internally, and is a common ingredient in many items such as perfume, toothpaste, mouthwash, lotions and other modern toiletries.

Physical Properties: Anti-infectious, anti-inflammatory, antiseptic, astringent and a tonic. It can be used to heal scar tissue and stretch marks. For a newborn baby, Myrrh can be applied around the navel to protect against infection from sloughing off of the umbilical cord. The smell can also be soothing to babies when breast-feeding. It protects in the case of cough, sore throat, thrush, ringworm, gum infections, cuts and bruises. It improves digestion, helps in cases of diarrhea and dysentery, hyperthyroidism, thrush, ringworm and varicose veins. When combined with Frankincense, Myrrh is good for moving the blood while Frankincense raises Chi, helping with arthritic conditions.

A Special Note: Myrrh has the highest count of Sesquiterpenes (75%) of all the oils. Research shows Myrrh to be a powerful immune system stimulant and anti-inflammatory medication. Studies show the high sesquiterpine content in Myrrh to be toxic to certain types of cancer. Although not as strong as traditional chemotherapy drugs, it is less likely to be toxic to healthy cells and cause fewer bad side effects because its live, plant-based origin is of similar chemical makeup to humans.

Skin/Cosmetic Use: Good for chapped, cracked, aging skin, eczema and bruises.

Spiritual/Emotional Uses: Used in prayer and meditation, Myrrh is soothing, clarifying and grounding to the intellect. It can be used for over-thinking, worry and mental distraction. Spiritually it inspires inner stillness and peace, with the ability to ease sorrow and grief. It subtly helps to heal the wounds of loss and rejection and embodies the soothing power of solitude.

Resources

Aromatherapy for Healing the Spirit by Gabriel Mojay

Healing Oils of the Bible by David Stewart

Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Google’s cache of http://fusionanomaly.net/myrrh.html

My continued thanks to Frangelica2000@yahoo.com for her excellent editing skills

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